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Franklin & Medway to Receive Grant for Charles River Pollution Control District Grant

August 3, 2009

August 3, 2009 

Senator Karen Spilka, House Majority Leader James Vallee and Representative Carolyn Dykema announced today that Franklin and Medway will receive part of a $895,000 State Revolving Fund (SRF) grant for the Charles River Pollution Control District.

Franklin and Medway are two of eight towns serviced by the Charles River Pollution Control District. The facility can process up to 4.6 million gallons of wastewater per day and treats the combined wastewater and domestic septage.

To increase energy efficiency and reduce costs, several renewable energy upgrades will be made to the treatment plant. The upgrades consist of installing 120kW solar panels and improving water system controls. The estimated annual cost savings for the operation of the treatment plant is $74,000, or 16 percent of the current cost to operate the plant. Additionally, the total estimated annual carbon dioxide reduction is 418 tons.

“Medway is indebted to Senator Spilka and our legislative delegation to receive State Revolving Funds to support the Charles River Pollution Control District,” stated Medway Town Administrator Suzanne Kennedy.  “Without access to this funding, the financial impact of the District’s assessment to the towns for these projects would have been significant.”

“This is fantastic news for the rate payers and for the environment,” stated Jeffrey Nutting, Franklin Town Administrator.  “I would like to thank our elected officials for helping to bring this funding to fruition.”

“Investing in the Charles River Pollution Control District is critical to making our communities cleaner and providing a healthy environment in which people can live,” stated Senator Karen Spilka (D-Ashland).  “The impact of this grant money will last far into the future, in terms of cost savings and reduced environmental impact.  I am extremely pleased to have worked with the town and state officials to bring this funding to fruition.”

“I am thrilled to see the Charles River Pollution Control District receive such worthwhile funding,” said Vallee, House Majority Leader. “This grant comes at a time when cost savings to towns and economic preservation are of the utmost importance; I am sure the funding will be put to excellent use and will help the Charles River Pollution Control District continue its efforts to deliver clean and safe water to our area.”  

“I’m pleased that this federal funding will be used to make the treatment plant more efficient and generate needed long-term savings for these communities,” state Representative Carolyn Dykema (D-Holliston).  “This investment in technology upgrades will decrease the plant’s impact on the environment and pay dividends year after year in energy savings for our towns.”

Massachusetts awards grants for energy efficient projects under the SRF, which is administered by the Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust, a joint effort of the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP), the Executive Office of Administration and Finance and the State Treasurer’s Office.

The SRF is comprised of two programs: the Clean Water Fund, which has awarded nearly $3.9 billion since 1991; and the Drinking Water Fund, which has awarded more than $975 million in projects since 1999.  The Clean Water SRF funds planning and construction projects, such as waste water treatment plants and upgrades to existing sewer systems. The Drinking Water SRF funds the engineering, design and construction of drinking water projects that protect public health and strengthen compliance with state and federal drinking water requirements.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) requires a portion of SRF funds to be utilized for grants, and 20 percent of the funds must also be used for “green infrastructure” improvements at treatment facilities. The SRF grants are expected to reduce the cost of the infrastructure projects by 8 to 14 percent.

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